Healthy Schools BC Resources

School Food Literacy Capacity Building Initiative Grants

General Grant Information

Up to twenty school communities (with regional representation) focused on working together to support food literacy in their school communities will be selected to receive $750 each in the 2015-16 school year. Food literacy is defined as having the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to choose, grow, prepare and enjoy food to support one’s health, community, and the environment. Students’ learning is enhanced when learning experiences extend beyond the classroom throughout the school and into the community. Through the School Food Literacy Capacity Building Initiative Grants each awardee will undertake a self-directed project that explores a comprehensive school health approach (CSH) to food literacy, through action and reflection on the linkages between teaching and learning activities and at least one other pillar of a CSH approach to food literacy. Participating schools communities will also be eligible to apply for an additional $500 to support identified action projects. Recipients will participate in regular opportunities for networking and learning with experts in the field and one another.

If your school/district is already working on food literacy initiatives, this could be an opportunity to learn, reflect on your practice and share your knowledge with others. Schools/districts will be supported to use an inquiry approach as a way to reflect on their practice, and to engage the whole school community — students, parents and families, school and district staff, community members and organizations, health authorities and others — in the process.

The vision of the School Food Literacy Capacity Building Initiative is that students in BC are food literate as schools and school districts adopt a comprehensive school health approach to food literacy.

A comprehensive school health approach (CSH), often called a whole school approach, to food literacy is about ensuring students have many opportunities – in the classroom, and in every aspect of their school experience – to develop food literacy. A comprehensive school health approach coordinates actions across all areas of the school in a planned, integrated and holistic way. Incorporating the mutually reinforcing pillars of a CSH approach to food literacy, listed below, supports the development of food literate students in healthy school communities:
  • Teaching and Learning: Fostering Food Literacy
  • Relationships and Environment: Improving School Food Environments
  • Community Partnerships: Supporting Schools to Achieve Their Food Literacy Goals
  • Out School Policies: Creating Supportive School Food Policies

Resources/More Information

Learn more about Food Literacy - what it is, what are its goals, who is involved and what are some ways you get involved?

Contact Brent Mansfield at bmansfield@dashbc.ca with questions or for support with the grant application process.

Applications are now closed.

Application Details

This section includes important information about:

  • who can apply
  • application deadline
  • expectations upon receiving grant funding
  • applying for more than one grant
  • how to apply and submit your application online

Who can apply for a grant?

Members of the school community can apply for a grant (e.g. educators, administrators, parents, support staff and community partners such as health professionals, etc.). However, the grant application must be submitted by or include the contact details for a member of the school (e.g. educator, administrator, support staff) who will serve as the primary contact person for the application. A community partner, such as a Public Health Nurse or Community Dietitian can fully participate in the grant application, however, a school staff must be the contact person.

When is the application deadline?

Applications will be accepted until November 13th, 2015.

What are the expectations tied to receiving funding?

  1. Working together towards food literacy in your school community. As the vision of the School Food Literacy Capacity Building Initiative is that students in BC are food literate as schools and school districts adopt a comprehensive school health approach to food literacy it is expected that school communities are working together to support students to have the knowledge, skills and attitudes necessary to choose, grow, prepare and enjoy food to support one’s health, community, and the environment.
  2. Student learning. Each project will explore linkages between teaching and learning activities and at least one other pillar of a CSH approach to food literacy.
  3. Learning from each other. Recipients will participate in regular (every 4-6 weeks) opportunities for networking and learning with experts in the field and one another through regional and provincial videoconferences and webinars beginning at the end of November.
  4. Connections with your school community and partners. As a comprehensive school health approach to food literacy is about ensuring students have many opportunities – in the classroom, and in every aspect of their school experience – to develop food literacy, it is requires strong support and involvement from diverse members of the school community, including educators, administrators, parents, support staff, and community partners. These partners could include community organizations, farmers, health professionals, municipalities, and many more depending on how your school’s food literacy goals.
  5. Sharing your story. You are required to share your story as a way to celebrate your progress, experiences, and to inspire others. Stories must be submitted by the end of the school year. This will be discussed further as part of the regular videoconferences.

We Want to Learn from You
The selected schools/districts will have regular opportunities to network and learn from each other. We hope to explore questions like:

  • How are food literacy concepts and activities being connected to diverse (cross-) curricular competencies and content?

  • How is curriculum-based student learning being supported by messages and practices across the school day and school food environment (sometimes called the hidden curriculum)?

  • How are community partners, including non-profit organizations, farmers, health professionals, municipalities, and many more supporting your school’s / district’s food literacy goals.

  • How are policies and guidelines at the classroom, school, school district and provincial level supporting students to be more food literate? How might this be improved and what action can you take to support this?

  • How do food literacy initiatives support school and community connectedness?

Can I/We apply for both a School Food Literacy Grant and HSN Grants?

Schools are welcome to apply for a Healthy Schools Network Grant in addition to a School Food Literacy Capacity Building Grant. Grant projects can be complementary to each other, or may be separate, but cannot be for the same project (i.e. they must have different learning outcomes). Since we strive for equity across schools who receive grants, if a school receives a School Food Literacy Grant, they are then only eligible to receive two HSN Grants. Schools can apply for up to three grants total. We encourage you to notify others within your school about your HSN Grant to also ensure equity in grant procurement as well as for providing an opportunity to align the grant-supported work across all aspects of the school.

How do I submit my application?

  • Click here to access the School Food Literacy Capacity Building Grant.
  • Complete the application form.
  • Once you have completed your application, simply click “submit” at the end of the application.
  • You will receive notification about grant application within approximately 1-2 weeks of your submission. DASH may contact you if we have questions related to your school’s application.
  • If approved, the grant will be mailed to the school contact at the mailing address of the school.

If you experience any challenges in submitting your application, please contact Brent Mansfield at bmansfield@dashbc.ca.

Applications are now closed.